little sarah Big World

Tag: parks

Re-Frame

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What I See / What I Say

Sunday in the Park, Hanamigawa

I say too much, and it’s not all that great.

Like saying, “more to come,” promising to catch up, write more regularly. Then I don’t. The last few months have been a string of good intentions that amount to…

Bright Things, Green Things

I’ve thought about not even addressing it, not wanting to reveal my true colors to potential new readers. Publicly admitting: I have a tendency to promise updates that grow heavy with a sense of obligation and then never bear fruit.

I will tell you: I have been writing, and studying. Trying to write not more, but better, while at the same time trying to carve out consistency. So pieces and posts come together more slowly, but with intention. With purpose, and meaning.

Words in Pictures

Let’s call it “trimming the fat,” and in the meantime I will satisfy your craving (that one I have, too) for beautiful pictures, simple words, something small. Something nice to hold on to.

Clover Again

Then you’ll know: when I do write, I have something to say. Otherwise, I’ll just show you. I’ll share parks and shrines and fascinating insects. Street signs and wet grass and skyscrapers and snacks.

Joro Gumo "Wood Spider"

For now, as needed, my lips are sealed.

But my lens is wide, wide open.

 

 

 

 

 

Lucky

Clover

On the way to work, cutting through the park as always, I saw two of the 5th graders looking for something in the grass. One of them I recognized as my own–facebook-obsessed, very social, very silly. I figured they were looking for a lost earring or bracelet. Nevertheless, it seemed an idyllic little image, a nice snapshot of my workday. I snuck a photo and didn’t get caught.

In class, their teacher used Sharing Time to briefly acknowledge today, September 11th, asking what that means to them. I did a mental double take, then did the math to confirm, when he pointed out that it was 12 years ago, before any of them were born. It doesn’t seem that long ago, to me. They don’t seem young enough to not know.

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Simplify

(w/ Chad)

And so we turn towards simplicity. Towards sanity and good health, and that means early morning runs and healthy, home-cooked meals, fewer vices and better sleep.

Our first meal cooked together!

It means long walks and longer talks, checking in every morning, and after work, and before bed. It means facing our problems (for me: job stress and anxiety) head-on, rationally, and knowing the difference between a worthy challenge and a waste of time.

momiji

Most of all, a turn towards simplicity means a turn towards each other, and towards what really matters in life–our well-being, our friends and family, our passions and interests, and our sense of wonder, inspiration, creativity and drive.

And yesterday it meant epic shopping: new wardrobes for new jobs, plus bags of books to feed our hungry minds. It meant a day trip to Tokyo, a shopping field trip, with burgers and fries and iced coffee and frequent pauses to observe/avoid the madness, plus a Sunday stroll through the park, and big plans for the future.

*       *       *

It feels good to follow our own good advice.

Lima, Peru

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The Good, The Bad, and The Hungry

So I got my alone time. A day and a half to explore Lima on my own, and parts of it were so satisfying–running in the park…

…buying trinkets and drinking fresh sugar cane juice in the artisan market…

…going for long, long walks on a dreary but not unpleasant day, just to check out the city, its people and plazas…

…admiring the architecture…

…and enjoying the city’s beauty, stopping to eat a churro or snap a photo, because I could. Because I was alone, at last.

On the other hand, Lima is also where I was snubbed by my couch surfing host, walked around for hours (literally) trying to find something to eat, and was openly sexually harassed (the ol’ ass-grab) just outside my hostel.

That was while I was on my way in just to grab my pack and catch a taxi to the airport.

I have never, in my entire life, been more ready to leave a city, more anxious to get back home. I was just done.

36 hours in Lima was more than enough. For me.