little sarah Big World

Tag: relaxation

Wasalaza

Sometimes a thing is so funny to me that once it starts being funny it doesn’t stop being funny. For life.

Like when Robby described his AA meetings as “a bunch of people sitting around smoking like animals.”

Or that New Year’s in Spain where I took a hanger out of the hall closet and hung my coat up in the bathroom.

Or there was this one time, with a bowl of cereal…actually I have never successfully told the cereal story without laughing myself to tears. It is just that funny to me, and usually not at all funny to anyone else.

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Creature Comforts

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A Room of One’s Own…in Peru

Early on in the trip I decided that I would like to finish things in comfort, or at least relative comfort–in a private hostel room. I just figured that after all the buses and taxis and jam-packed dorms and ever-changing couch surfs–not to mention constant “companionship” from B & J–I’d want some privacy and relaxation for my brief stay (1 night only) in Lima. So I booked it, weeks out.

Then I second-guessed myself, as I’ve been known to do. “I’ve spent so much money already, and why wouldn’t I want to couch surf and meet someone who could show me the best of Lima since I’m only there one night, and I am so anti-social and lame, blerg!”

So I found a couch surf (with a girl, which is rare), cancelled my reservation, and felt I’d done the right thing.

Guess what, though? My original, non-exhausted, non-panicking self was right. The couch surf turned out to be a bust. The girl wasn’t even home, and I was supposed to stay in the care of her little sister, but then lil sis had to go to class with her house keys, which meant I needed to stay in their filthy, piss-smelling apartment in a shady part of town until the older sister (my couch surfing contact) came home. Six hours.

PANIC.

You don’t need to hear about The Panic, though. Let me just say that after several frantic phone calls, emails, and a quick escape via taxi, I was able to reclaim my previously-reserved room 1900 Backpacker’s Hostel, where I spread out and relaxed to my heart’s content.

(Big sigh of relief)

Seriously, though, I was so giddy at having my own space for the first time in nearly a month that I lied down on the floor and made something like snow angels. Then I went for a long run while listening to Adele. Then I danced around my room in joy. Then I had food from a vegan restaurant (!!!) that was just down the street.

Then I watched bootlegged American movies on the hostel’s big TV, drank beer, ate snacks, and went to bed. Happy as a clam

Moral of this story? Trust yourself. Trust that you know yourself, and do as you please.

Home Stay

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I Could Not Have Danced All Night

As I mentioned, I was sick and bummed out on Amantani, during our home-stay. But it wasn’t all a bust, Friends! It was also very peaceful and relaxing at times.

Moreover, it was really cool to get to meet this family that I wouldn’t otherwise have met–Catalina and her 4-year-old son, Anderson (her older daughter and husband were away on errands for the weekend)–stay in their home and eat meals with them.

That was a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and for that I’m grateful to have braved extreme exhaustion, lung tremors, and cultural commodification.

Oh, and did I mention…the food?!

This was honestly the best I ate the entire time in South America. Lunch was a brothy quinoa soup (with quinoa they’d grown in their own yard–I’d never seen that!) followed by roasted corn and root vegetables (including a variety of potato that was sweet yet hard, like a carrot) with fried goat cheese. We washed it all down with fresh lemon-balm tea made with whole, recently harvested herbs.

It was just what the doctor ordered. Dinner was a similar soup, followed by starch-on-starch crime–pasta and potatoes with a side of white rice. Still, though, it was home-cooked meal, and very satisfying.

I spent most of the time trying to get to know our hosts, though Anderson was shy and Catalina was having none of it. She seemed very used to having guests in her home (she’s been doing it nearly 10 years) but kept interaction to a minimum. I wanted to know, more than anything, how she felt about this experience, as to me it was such a unique clash of cultures.

But to Catalina (as I finally managed to ascertain), it’s just an easy second job, which means that she doesn’t have to work outside of the home. They host two guests, once a week, and the ends meet. Simple as that.

Then the rest of the time she can knit, talk with friends or family, and farm.

And I suppose she likes it like that? I don’t know. I spent less than 24 hours with her, and I’m reluctant to generalize (though I’m sure I already have). I guess what I mean to say is that I hope she’s happy with the arrangement. And I think it will be interesting to see the impact the constant influx of foreigners has on Anderson. For now, he seems pleased. And shy.

Goal Orientation

Things I Am Going to Do Today:

sleep in

drink coffee/pay bills/check up on blogs/pinterest

snack (salty)

– play nintendo with Kevin

– read (Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal Vegetable Miracle)

– nap

– snack (sweet)

– run

– work

– try to reconcile with a friend. again.

– make lists/set goals

 *       *       *

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about goals. Making them, keep them, tracking them. I’ve decided that what I’d like best is to have a goal for every year, every season, every month, every week, and every day. That sounds like a lot, but really it’s not. For example, today is Tuesday, June 12th, 2012. It is summer, I am 26 years old, and here are my goals:

26 Years – be more bad-ass and independent; know thyself

Summer – go for more long walks

June – fast AND organize/decorate the apartment

This Week – better time management

Today – relax and do as I please

 

See? That’s not so much, is it? And they fit nicely within one another, like Russian nesting dolls. It is important to note, however, that goals are not the same as a To-Do list. Today’s To-Do list involves calling my dad, paying the bills, blogging for the library, etc. A To-Do list is about tasks and accomplishments, whereas my goals are about growth and progress. They represent a steady evolution, rather than a check-mark.

And the list above? Well, that’s just because I realized that I would be able to do everything I wanted to do today, at a more-or-less leisurely pace, despite having slept in until ALMOST 11:00 and having to work at 4:00. It pleased me, and so I celebrated with a list.

*       *       *

How about you? What are your goals for today, tomorrow, this week, this month? What are your summer goals? What do you want to do with this year of your life? And, most importantly, how are you going to make this happen?