little sarah Big World

Tag: snacks

Life’s a Trip

~OR~

“I could go forever with a car, the open road, good music, and good company”

Looking up in Rip Van Winkle Park

Do you remember when you said that if all we had was a bed and music, we could have an amazing time?

Café Lumiere, I believe

But we also have coffee–sometimes fancy (with maximum adjectives), sometimes simple (black). Sometimes instant, after a nap or with our sunlight closet kitchen breakfasts.

The Russian Way

And we have amazing friends, from all over the world. Friends who make us P-shaped sofa beds to sleep on after arriving in the middle of the night–post-party–after 13 hours of driving. Friends who make speeches, or take us to a private beach, or get us tipsy on champagne on a sunny winter’s afternoon.

Now with more regular sustenance

We have words, too, and crosswords, and we divide and conquer, for maximum fun. We have a new-found sense of comfort around each other, so that just as the faint worry forms itself in my mind (“What if we just sit here and eat in silence like all the saddest couples?”), it is obliterated by how utterly easy it is to be around you.

you coo lay leigh

We have a ukulele! We lose entire mornings to it, burn through lazy afternoons and surprise each other with our sweet-yet-simple, earnest efforts to plunk out a tune. So we do have music, but now we make music, too.

P, B, and J

We have snacks for days, and sometimes we have meals. We cook together, and sometimes we say “Fuck it,” and get take-out, and it feels like the most fun, the most giddy and indulgent thing. It feels like milk and cookies with a friend after school. It feels like a sleepover. Like no parents no rules.

sunny slopes in Pacific Grove

And we have sunshine. We have sunshine in our hearts, and warming our scalps, and electrifying our pulses, and we have it in the kitchen, and coming in through the wintery west windows, and in the middle of December. We have easy sunsets on the conversation-fueled charges from Utah to California and back, and we have a steady, stealthy sunrise as we pull into the City of Salt, 8am, 13 hours weary but ready to keep going.

We do a loop around the valley. We arrive back home exhausted, thrilled, enamored.

*       *       *

So yes, music and a bed would be enough. But we have so, so much more.

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Tacna, Peru

~OR~

What 24+ Hours of Travel Looks Like

After San Pedro, we were headed to Puno, Peru, which would take about 18 hours if you could drive straight there. But it took us over 24. And why is that? Border crossing, bus schedules, and lies. Or, “the story of Peru.” Basically, there is no direct route, and so we wound up passing a few hours in Tacna, the first town after you cross the Chile-Peru border.

We left San Pedro at about 8:30 at night and arrived in Arica, Chile at about 5am. Then we waited for the border-crossing to open at 8, while I talked to an old French guy about his various lovers spread throughout Europe. Anything was better than being ignored by B & J, I figured, and plus I got to practice my (rustier-than-I’d-thought) French.

Once the border crossing opened up, we took a 5-minute bus from Arica to the border, where we got off and went through various lines and inspections. (Fun fact: my lime didn’t make it through but Josh’s orange did). Then we got back on the bus and drove another 5 minutes or so to Tacna, where we spent the morning walking around, eating, and buying snacks in the market for our forth-coming bus ride to Puno.

Brett and Josh pointed out that the market in this little border town (which Lonely Planet doesn’t seem to think very much of) was nicer than any market in Asuncion, the Paraguayan capital. It wasn’t a bad place to spend a few hours, and we met some nice people at the tourist agency (our first) who basically made our trip to Puno/Lake Titicaca possible.

From here, the bus ride was supposed to be only 5 hours, but we didn’t arrive in Puno until long after dark–tired, cold, and hungry. It was on this bus ride that I resorted to ripping blank pages out of the book I was reading (Committed, by Elizabeth Gilbert) to blow my nose.

Which is equal parts sad and resourceful.

Goal Orientation

Things I Am Going to Do Today:

sleep in

drink coffee/pay bills/check up on blogs/pinterest

snack (salty)

– play nintendo with Kevin

– read (Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal Vegetable Miracle)

– nap

– snack (sweet)

– run

– work

– try to reconcile with a friend. again.

– make lists/set goals

 *       *       *

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about goals. Making them, keep them, tracking them. I’ve decided that what I’d like best is to have a goal for every year, every season, every month, every week, and every day. That sounds like a lot, but really it’s not. For example, today is Tuesday, June 12th, 2012. It is summer, I am 26 years old, and here are my goals:

26 Years – be more bad-ass and independent; know thyself

Summer – go for more long walks

June – fast AND organize/decorate the apartment

This Week – better time management

Today – relax and do as I please

 

See? That’s not so much, is it? And they fit nicely within one another, like Russian nesting dolls. It is important to note, however, that goals are not the same as a To-Do list. Today’s To-Do list involves calling my dad, paying the bills, blogging for the library, etc. A To-Do list is about tasks and accomplishments, whereas my goals are about growth and progress. They represent a steady evolution, rather than a check-mark.

And the list above? Well, that’s just because I realized that I would be able to do everything I wanted to do today, at a more-or-less leisurely pace, despite having slept in until ALMOST 11:00 and having to work at 4:00. It pleased me, and so I celebrated with a list.

*       *       *

How about you? What are your goals for today, tomorrow, this week, this month? What are your summer goals? What do you want to do with this year of your life? And, most importantly, how are you going to make this happen?